Victoria’s Boston Photoshoot

Inspiration, photography tips

I hadn’t seen my friend Victoria since we studied in London together a few years ago, so when I traveled to Boston this weekend to shoot a wedding, I knew we had to get together and do a shoot in Boston! We did a super fun photoshoot in London at Regents Park, so round 2 was in order!

We started at the gorgeous bridge in Boston Common and wandered from there. I was obsessed with the willow trees around the park, so I’m glad I captured them in the background of the shot. This is the lake where they do the iconic swan boating in Boston! The lighting was a little overcast, but it made for really nice even lighting for her portraits, so I shot everything natural light.

Then we stumbled onto the new carousel, and I thought it would be a great spot for some colorful shots. I tried a technique at the carousel that ended up looking really cool. I slowed down the shutter speed (also called dragging) so as it moved around, it created the blurry effect on the background. I had Victoria stand really still while I dragged the shutter so she would still be really sharp in focus. I also had a little fun with the editing, using Color Selection to make the shadows blue (one of my favorite techniques–I think it adds a really editorial effect).

Then she got out her fun rainbow umbrella and we did some colorful shots around the garden. I love any excuse to add lots of vibrant color, and I think the close up portrait of Victoria looks great with the rainbow in the background.

We ended by these old cobblestone streets and tried some movement and walking shots. I edited the first one by adding a pink gradient over the image and fading it. Something simple like a gradient can totally change the vibe of the image and make it look really unique! I hope this shoot illustrates that you don’t have to shoot for a long time or with a lot of different outfits to create images that are vibrant and different from each other. Here’s one more example of a gradient I used over a black and white shot:

Send me your street style shoots in different cities, I would love to see them! If you like these photos, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Top 10 Photography Questions I Get Asked

photography tips

What kind of camera should I buy? I can’t tell you what to buy, but I can tell you what I use. I’ve used Nikon and Canon gear and I prefer Canon. I love the image quality, the crispness of the images, the colors, the low light compensation. I shoot with a 5D Mark iii and Mark iv, but I honestly think any DSLR body can get you started. It’s a lot more about the experience level of the person holding the camera than the camera itself. That being said, lenses can help a lot, too. I love the 50mm and the 24-70. Start playing around and see what you like!

Why is hiring a photographer so expensive? I’m glad you asked! It’s expensive because we’re a business and we incur other costs besides just paying for the camera. Here are just a few annual costs photographers have: the Adobe Suite, computer updates, external hard drives, cloud storage, memory cards, seamless backdrops, lighting equipment, props, insurance, lenses, flashes, website yearly hosting and domain costs, accounting services, legal fees for photography contracts, workshops and classes. Not to mention the time and expertise you are paying for when you hire a photographer. A lot more goes into it than people think.

What’s the difference between an iPhone and a DSLR? Don’t get me wrong, you can take awesome pictures on your iPhone. But not quality ones. I use my phone every day to capture the city and document the world around me. But to really get quality images, I use my DSLR. There are so many more pixels and the file is so much bigger on a professional camera, so you can do more with the image. Higher quality and more options for lenses and depth of field creates more room to explore and experiment. But at the same time, start exploring with photography on your phone if you don’t want to buy a camera just yet. It’s supposed to be fun and creative!

How can I get the blurry background on my photos? That’s called Bokeh. You can learn all about it and how to get it on my article right here.

Do I need to learn manual mode on my camera? Yes! I think that Manual mode is key to understanding your camera and photography. You have a lot more room for creative expression if you are aware of the technical side of photography and can adjust it on-the-go. I learned by playing around with my camera, but a good place to start is with YouTube tutorials (or Linda.com if you have a library card!). When you know how to change the lighting, white balance, ISO, aperture and shutter speed on your own, you can be really sure you’re creating the types of images that you want. In my experience, learning more about my camera has only helped make my images more fun and creative!

Is editing photos important? I think it’s the crucial second step after shooting the image itself. To me, capturing the shot is a special art that takes practice and intuition, but editing that photo to your final vision is like sculpting the final details of an art piece. I use it to remove unnecessary elements from the shot, be it distracting spots in the background, wrinkles on a shirt, or cropping out space that doesn’t add to the focal point of the shot. Then I fix the white balance and adjust the color, usually making the shot more vibrant and punchy. The last thing I do is smooth out skin, whiten teeth, remove stray hair, and any other soft adjustments to enhance the subject. That might sound pretty simple, but it’s taken me years and years to perfect my editing style and find a balance of enhancing without overdoing.

How do you get paid to do photography? It’s a long process that won’t happen overnight. First you need to build a portfolio in the area that you want to produce work in. That might mean doing free or trade shoots with other vendors. For example, when I first moved to NYC, I produced styled shoots for wedding photography to build my portfolio. I got makeup artists, florists, and dress designers to lend me their products or skills in exchange for the photos to add to their portfolio as well. Other times I did free shoots for people to build my portfolio and gain experience. Once you feel you’re at a point where you have the knowledge and skillset to charge people, start doing it! Talk to other photographers and learn their pricing structure so you have something to base your rates off of. Increase as you become more skilled. It might take a few years, but your client base will grow as you do!

Is being a photographer hard? Yes and no. But mostly yes. It’s a career that you have to be really passionate about, and it will take a lot of work to be successful. I put in work almost every evening and weekend because I want my photography business to succeed. I reach out to potential clients and collaborators every week because I want to progress my brand. I shoot day in and day out and edit every free chance I get because I want to get better. So I guess no, on the surface being a photographer isn’t hard. But wanting to be a great photographer is. You have to put in the work to see results.

What do you use to edit photos and do you make your own presets? I do a base cull and edit in Lightroom and then I do all my final retouching in Photoshop. I generally make my own presets, but I also have some from photographers I like that I play around with on occasion. Presets are really nice when you have a lot of photos to edit at once–like a wedding for instance, but I like to mix things up for beauty and styled shoots. I find that I usually have a bit of a vision when I bring the raw photos into Lightroom, and I explore from there. Once I find a color and balance that I like, I’ll apply the preset to the batch and then go in and do adjustments per image.

How do you get the perfect shot? There’s really no perfect shot, just the right movements at the right time. I think being patient helps. For example, when I shoot concerts, I usually have an idea of the type of shot I’m looking for, and then I just wait ready to shoot when the artists is moving around stage. Framing is key for good shots, as well as being able to change the exposure in camera quickly. Being skilled at Manual mode really helps with this. Also, practice helps. As many times as I’ve gotten a really cool shot, I’ve also missed the shot because it was out of focus or overexposed (this happens with concerts a lot) or I just framed it wrong. The good news is that the more photos you take, the bigger chance you have of getting “the shot.”

The Color Factory NYC Photoshoot

Inspiration, photography tips

My friend Cameisha modeled for The Color Factory for their opening last year, so she asked me if I wanted to go back and take some fun fashion shots! I knew that the pop up was filled with dozens of colorfully painted rooms with awesome activities, so I was super excited to explore with her and shoot some photos.

One of the first rooms we walked in was bright ombre red and orange. There are all these balloons that are blowing around with words and phrases on them (my favorite was “a lot of pizza”). We had fun trying to make the balloons stay still long enough for a quick photo.

Another cool thing about The Color Factory is that all the walls have stripes, rainbows, and colors galore! Literally every hallway, door, room, and corner are covered with colors, murals, and art pieces. It makes the entire experience a prime spot for all photo taking. Of course we had to do a quick outfit change with her fun sequin pants to match the vibrant walls.

My personal favorite room is the Disco room! It’s covered in sequins, a dance floor, neon, and is blasting with music. You feel like you’re in a nightclub of color. Cameisha’s black feather coat and neon pink bodysuit made for the perfect combination.

We went a little crazy and even had Cameisha lay on the disco lit floor for a few shots. People did stare, just a little bit. That’s the only downside of shooting in a public place–you have to be okay causing a bit of a scene. Fashion shoots in public are not for the faint of heart!

The last room is definitely the best–a massive blue ball pit filled with literally thousands of balls to jump in, play with, and of course, take photos with. To get this shot, I had to dive in with her so I could shoot from a little bit of an overhead angle. I highly recommend flash for these types of pictures, because lighting was a little dark. The last thing is to be patient, because there were a lot of people also playing in the ball pit, and the last thing you want in a fashion shot is random strangers in the background.

Overall, we had a blast, and I highly recommend you check out The Color Factory, or maybe The Pint Shop, or the newest pop-up in NYC, Pixinity. Pop-ups are a such a fun way to take unique photos and get creative!

If you like these photos, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Best Graffiti Walls in NYC to Photograph

Inspiration, photography tips

When my cousin asked me if I’d shoot some fun engagement photos for her and her fiancee, I was immediately excited. They’re a super fun couple who hate the traditional cheesy engagement shots, so I knew our shoot would be fun and totally out of the box–something I’m always down to try with photography.

We immediately started scouring Instagram for the best spots in NYC with the coolest graffiti. I’d walked by a lot of cool spots in passing, but I had never really put together a definitive list on the best spots to keep track of. So, after we ran around shooting all day–and I do mean the entire day–we had tons of good spots that I would recommend for you guys to try if you’re looking for good shooting spots. Here they are:

  1. Freeman Alley

This spot was perfect for them because they don’t love having to take pictures while an audience of people watches. Freeman Alley is pretty hard to find if you don’t know that it’s there, so there’s never a ton of people hanging around, which makes pictures easier. The graffiti in the alley is always changing, but theres a diverse selection to choose from. Also, while you’re there, grabbing a bite at Freeman’s is never a bad idea!

2. Houston Bowery Mural

This is one of the more known spots downtown, but that doesn’t make it any less photogenic! The mural gets changed every few months, so there’s always something new to shoot with. Queen Andrea is the most recent artists selected to decorate the wall, and it’s filled with vibrant colors and a massive “Believe” script over the top. It’s massive, so you’ll have plenty of room to get your shots for The ‘Gram. Just be careful though, because it’s right next to the busy street.

3. NOMO SOHO Graffiti Wall

We saw this wall in our inspiration pics, but didn’t know exactly where it was, so it was a huge surprise as we were strolling down Crosby Street and came across this piece and the ivy archway. It’s definitely a great spot for pictures, and the pastel tones on the brick come across beautifully in camera. Just note that this is an entrance to a hotel, so people will probably be walking back and forth, but don’t let that stop you from getting your shot!

4. Dumbo Love Wall

I told you we went everywhere–we even made it to Brooklyn before the sun set! If you’ve walked around NYC, chances are you’ve probably seen some heart murals. Those belong to JGoldcrown, a British graffiti artist based in NY and LA. We shot at the Dumbo one, but he has murals up in Freeman Alley, Mott Street, St. Marks, and Williamsburg. This is such an iconic NYC graffiti stop, and I think it’s a must for your graffiti photo list.

5. Wandering!

My last tip for you: wander around. Here’s just a few other places we went that ended up having super cool or cute graffiti. The coolest part about NYC is that it’s constantly changing, and a piece you love might be replaced next week with a totally new one. Definitely pick out your spots, but make sure you plan in some time to wander around and see what you can find in the city. If you do happen to stumble onto some great spots, let me know and I’ll add them to the list!

Special thanks to A and Ty for such a fun day in NYC and trusting me with their pictures. And if you like these, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

UES. Ice Cream Photoshoot

Inspiration

One of my favorite things to do in NYC is bring my camera to places that have cute backdrops and cause a huge scene doing a mini photoshoot in a public place with lots of people staring at us.

Okay, I’m joking, but seriously, sometimes restaurants, graffiti walls, and NYC popups are too cute to just snap a pic with my iPhone. So I get all dressed up, trudge to the location in heels, bring my wide lens and a flash, and just have a full-on photoshoot wherever we are. Pro tip: You can’t be embarrassed by this in NYC. Everyone is doing mini photoshoots for The Gram, so I just go with it and act like it’s perfectly natural to be staging a shoot in whatever public place we’re at that day.

A few faves: The Pint Shop. It’s a pink paradise with larger than life pints of ice cream and sprinkles. The Gucci photo pop up. It’s a room filled with hundreds of old photographs and Polaroids. And most recently, UES. ice cream shop, well, in the Upper East Side. This place has a twist, though. You have to say a codeword to the shop manager, and suddenly the wall of hundreds of pints of ice cream opens to reveal a secret door that leads you into a hidden speakeasy in the back!

WHAT! Pretty sweet, huh?! When my friend told me about it, I was excited to go and check it out, but I knew that I wanted a cute photo in front of that adorable ice cream wall, so we rounded up a few girlfriends and met outside the shop to get our ice cream and drink on.

When we got there, we realized that the shop was tiny, and only about 4-5 people can fit in there at a time. It was a tight squeeze, but we managed to get a cute waffle cone with sprinkles and snap some fun shots (with strangers onlooking, but you can’t be bothered by that in NYC) before saying the secret phrase: “I’d like to volunteer for your storage room.”

Then suddenly, an attendant whisked us to the back, revealing the speakeasy! We spent the rest of the evening in ice cream bliss, enjoying our sweets, ice cream flavored drinks, and the excitement of the hidden secrecy of the place. If you’re in NYC, it’s definitely worth a visit for the delicious ice cream and drinks in the back.

Check out some of the photos we took below:

Brooklyn Bridge Engagement Sunset Shoot

photography tips

Just as I had written a post last week about my Brooklyn Bridge shoot, a couple contacted me wanting to do an engagement shoot of sorts on the bridge at sunset! They had lived in NYC for a few years but moved to Boston for medical school, and wanted to come back to do a shoot before they got married. I was super hyped to help them capture this moment, so I said of course!

I was excited to shoot again on the bridge, but this time I shot on the BK side, so the shots had a little bit different feel with the Manhattan skyline in the background. I’ve decided that either side works perfectly, and it just depends what time of day you’re shooting to which side you might want to shoot from.

Evening was the only time that worked for them, and I knew that would be a little tricky with all the people, but we managed to still get some adorable shots even with all the tourists walking the bridge! If you have the time (and don’t mind getting up at dawn) then I’d definitely say go for sunrise or early morning shots. The benefit to this is that hardly anyone will be on the bridge, so the background will look a little cleaner.

We ended up having a few breaks of people and I had enough time to snap some shots without anyone in the background, which was lucky because there were hundreds of people crossing the bridge! But sometimes you have to be crafty with your angles and just make it work.

The other tip I’d say is that Ela was wearing heels and I had forgotten that it’s a pretty long trek to get to the archway of the bridge (at least a 10-15 minute walk on the BK side) so definitely bring a change of shoes if you’re planning on wearing heels or something that’s not too comfortable for a mini hike. Besides that, the weather was perfect and we had a great time shooting!

You can check out my favorite photos from the shoot below:

If you like these, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Brooklyn Bridge Sunrise Wedding Shoot

wedding photography

I met my good friend Stanley when I first moved to NYC. He’s the sweetest guy in the entire world, and his wife is even more adorable! Stanley and I are both photographers, and through some of the wedding shoots we did together, he told me that he didn’t hire a professional photographer for his wedding!

As a photographer, I was like, “Dude, you’re crazy!” A photographer not getting high quality pictures at his own wedding?! I knew we had to remedy this. So when we got the opportunity to shoot some new Hayley Paige dresses in NYC, I thought, THIS IS IT!

Dress by Hayley Paige

I pretty much insisted (and wouldn’t take no for an option) that he and his lovely wife model the looks, and get some much needed gorgeous wedding photos. We decided to shoot on the Brooklyn Bridge at sunrise. It was a substantial undertaking, because we knew that to be *at* the BKB by 5am, we’d have to get ready, do makeup, etc. wayyy before that.

We ended up meeting around 3am to start the project (Stanley was late per usual). There were some very sleepy eyes and tired brains involved. But everything was worth it once we got to the bridge. There was nobody on the bridge, besides a few cyclists here and there. It was the perfect setting, and the sun was just about to rise.

Sunrise on the Brooklyn Bridge

And they turned out to be the MOST gorgeous photos I’ve ever taken there. Stanley and his wife looked absolutely stunning, and the backdrop of the city was even better than I could have hoped for. They were so natural together, and the intricate detail of the dress matched perfectly.

The second we started shooting, we knew that waking up in the middle of the night had totally been worth it for the shots. We shot everything in about 45 minutes, and just like that, the sun had risen and people started to wake up. Tourists began walking on the bridge, and we headed home for a nice nap.

To this day, they are still some of my all-time wedding photos I’ve taken EVER. Because, look at how adorable they are! When I do styled shoots, I almost always like to use real couples as the models, because you can tell how authentic their love is in the shot.

Tips For Shooting On The Brooklyn Bridge: Go for sunrise. Hardly anyone will be there, which will mean you can grab the perfect shot, and get the gorgeous golden hour tones. Walk over from the Manhattan side, I’ve found that the lighting is better this way.

Check out the rest of my favorites from the shoot:

Should You Credit Your Photographer?

Uncategorized

Matt Healy of the popular British rock band The 1975 has sparked a huge debate online this week with an Instagram post and a question. He posted a photo of himself at a concert, taken by music photographer Robert Gallardo, and asked his followers how they felt about crediting your photographer. Healy stated that since he personally knew the photographer, he felt the need to credit him for his image, but that in general he thought it was not necessary for the artist to credit the photographer if it was an image of himself. You can read the full text of his comment below.

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There were thousands of comments from artists, musicians, and fans chiming in on their opinions. An overwhelming number of people responded in favor of crediting the photographer, due to the fact that it’s an original artwork that they have created and therefore should be credited as such. Photographer Ashly Nicole compared the scenario to other mediums and forms to make her point, saying, “You had people share your art and say it was created by you, and it should be the same for a photographer or even an illustrator. Just because it’s not the same medium as your art, doesn’t make it not art nor extinguish the hard work put into the art. Give credit no matter the medium,”

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As a photographer myself watching this unfold, I was pretty shocked. I know how it feels to put in a lot of time and effort for a photoshoot only for it to be posted by a media outlet or someone online without proper credit. For someone with such a big platform and voice in the industry, it’s disheartening to see Healy take that stance. He might not realize it, but he has the power to impact the entire career of a photographer by posting one photo that they have taken.

In this social media age, your work being shown by accounts with millions of followers holds a lot of value. When someone like Matt Healy posts your photo, the digital currency of your work increases. By not tagging the photographer, you’re effectively robbing them of potential opportunities, future jobs, and exposure. To me, that’s stealing.

No matter the medium, when people put in hard work, they deserve to be credited. There’s a reason that there are credits at the end of a movie and the back of a magazine. It’s to acknowledge when someone has participated in a production. The same goes for photographers, and makeup artists, and designers, and painters. I’m a photographer, so I might be biased, but I think credit should always be given.

Healy updated his post later, stating that he “lost the debate” and tagging Robert Gallardo in the post. What are your thoughts? Comment below what you would have done, or how you think this impacts the industry standards of crediting photographers.

Moving To NYC

Inspiration

I always had a feeling that I didn’t quite fit in, in Callaway County, MO, Population 44,000, but it started to become extra obvious around my preteen years. While other girls were decorating their rooms with butterflies and stars, I filled canvases with skyscrapers and pictures of the Eiffel and the Arc de Triomph. I asked my parents for supplies to learn knitting and screen printing and video editing and painting, and once they put the camera in my hand, it never left. 

My mom had given it to me to take pictures at a concert, but while I was waiting in line, I saw a lady wearing a gorgeous cream-colored sun hat with colorful beads on the rim, just barely covering her eyes, and I took a picture of her face. When I showed my mom, she scolded me, saying, “Gaby, stop taking pictures of strangers!” She didn’t understand yet, but I did. Even then, I knew I wanted to capture people, to make them timeless, to show the beauty in life, to show the essence of being human. It wasn’t until almost a decade later, in college, when I was told the word for what I was creating: portraits. 

Some kids ask for a car on their 16th birthday. I asked to take a trip to New York City. I stepped onto the concrete playground and fell in love. I walked around Manhattan with wonder and Central Park in awe. It was even better than I’d hoped. I knew I wanted to live there. And now, somehow, my dream is finally coming true. Today is the day. My plane leaves Lambert in an hour. But it’s still pretty scary. I just want to find a place to call home in the creative world where I know I belong, because, for my artistic side, that place was never Missouri.

I cant wait for the adventures, the art, the creating and hating and loving and funny moments and small still silences and the crazy bustling streets and coffeeshops and the overwhelming sense of movement and life and progression and finding yourself and getting lost on the way and everything in between. A city I love, a craft I love, and time. Fingers crossed. 

As I paid for my one-way ticket to LaGuardia airport, I had to chuckle, because it asked, “Business or Personal?” It’s both.

Success Tips For Emerging Creatives

Inspiration, photography tips

I know what you’re thinking: here we go, another one of those vague articles about how to be successful that doesn’t actually explain anything at all, except ending with some inspirational quote like, “the world is yours, so get out there and do something!” They’re kind of inspiring, but also never really say what you’re actually supposed to do. Well, this week is my one year anniversary of being a college graduate, and so far the real world has taught me a lot more about failure than success. So I thought I’d write about what I’ve learned thus far, in hopes that other young creatives might find it helpful.

Stop Comparing Yourself. First of all, in creative careers especially, your definition of success will most likely be wildly different from someone else’s, even in the same field. As a creative, you can’t compare yourself to other people. My graphic designer and illustrator friends are amazing, but they do a totally different job than me, a photographer. You should appreciate the value of the other people in your team, but you do a highly specialized and individualized job, too, and that’s worth a lot. And just because you have less experience doesn’t mean you’re any less of a professional. That’s something I had to learn to accept. When I’m bidding jobs against other photographers who have ten or twenty years more experience than me, I have to be confident in my craft (that, or fake it ’til you make it).

Identify What You’re Trying to Achieve. As a freelancer first starting out, it can be especially difficult and confusing to determine where to even begin. Should you make connections? Advertise yourself? Do a few free jobs to get your name out there? The most important thing you need to do is figure out what you’re trying to achieve. What’s your end goal? Analyze your objectives and determine what quantifiable steps you can take to move toward them.

For me right now, as an emerging photographer, success means networking, making connections, promoting myself and getting new opportunities. Once you have that outlined, you can make an action plan. Sometimes small steps make the biggest difference. For example, to get my name out there, I made some flyers of my images and my Instagram username and posted them in areas around London that I knew models and makeup artists would see them. It took an hour of my time, and around $15 to get color prints, and I’m still getting emails from designers to shoot their lookbooks and new collections.

Say Yes, and Keep Saying Yes. Since I’ve been in London, I made a little deal with myself. I agreed that I would accept all the shoots that I’m offered, even if it’s not my specific niche of fashion portraiture. In the past few months, I have shot concerts, a designer handbag collection, street style for a fashion blogger, red carpet events, and even the London Fashion Week runway. It totally pushed me out of my comfort zone, and every single one of those shoots taught me something new. 

My point is this: while new opportunities can be terrifying, they are are important, if not crucial to expanding your knowledge and skill set. Those shoots made me think outside the box and determine creative solutions that I had never dealt with before. Besides cultivating a deeper understanding of your craft, those kinds of skills will be useful in any potential future job. That’s why I think it’s highly important to say yes, even if that particular job isn’t specifically part of your end goal.

Put In the Work, and Work Hard. This one might seem obvious, but from observing my peers in the industry, I think it’s a pretty underrated and necessary step. You have to put in the work. You will have long shoot days and late nights editing. You’ll have to carry a reflector and sometimes get coffee for people, but it’s not for nothing. It’s propelling you closer to that end goal, even if you can’t see it just yet. For example, I assisted for a photographer in London on a one-day shoot, and it wasn’t a big deal, but I made sure to be as helpful and cheerful as possible on set. A few months later, he came back to London to do a cover shoot with a big magazine, and he asked me to assist again. Because of that, I met the entire creative team of that magazine and was able to make connections with them.

Every opportunity leads to another one, if you let it. You just have to be paying attention. You can have all the talent in the world, but if you aren’t putting effort into actively promoting yourself and trying to get clients and make contacts, they won’t come to you. You have to go to them. You have to be a little pushy sometimes. Make calls to agencies, send a lot of emails, and accept that you’re going to get a lot of rejection replies. They will still sting a little, but it hurts less each time. Send more.

So, while I can’t tell you that adding all the editors of Vogue on LinkedIn will be a guaranteed way for you to make new connections in the fashion industry, I can tell you from personal experience that if you try these tips, you will be pushing yourself and making tangible strides toward the success you want to achieve. And the most rewarding part is that you’ll meet some really talented and likeminded people along the way.