9 Poses in 9 Minutes

photography tips

If you never quite sure just how to pose with your partner for a great picture, or you’re a photographer looking for posing ideas, then this is the article for you! I’ve compiled a list of my go-to poses for couples, and I have a one-page freebie at the bottom for you to keep as a helpful guide! Big thanks to my favorite couple Jersey and Luis for being my models for this project (and standing in the freezing New York City winter weather to get these shots!) Now let’s dive into these poses.

Lean Toward Each Other

Position the couple so one person’s shoulder is leaning into the other person’s chest, and have the person behind wrap their arm around and lightly grab the right arm of the first person. It helps to mention to lean their heads toward each other and getting their noses close together. This cozy pose is great for a mid shot, or a close up.

Facing Each Other

This one is an easy one. Have the two look at each other while holding hands. Can be used for a wide shot or a close up, and you can play with how close they are standing to each other. One person can also wrap their hands around the other person’s neck and lean in close for a kiss (warning: it’s adorable!!)

Facing The Camera

The classic shot shows the couple fairly close together with one person wrapping their arm around the other. You can vary the hands–hands in pockets, hands straight down, or like in this shot, Jersey had her hand by her face, tucking her hair behind her ear. Do whatever feels most natural for you.

Half Looking at the Camera

This can be a great moment. Have one person look at their partner while the other person looks at the camera. This usually results in some natural smiles and laughs, because who doesn’t get excited when they spend a few seconds taking in how lovely their partner looks?! A great variation of this can be to alternate having both partners look at each other at the same time.

The Ear Whisper

Alright, now that you are warmed up and have the basic poses down, here are a few advanced level poses! This one is a great prompt I use with couples. When a couple is already fairly close to each other, I’ll tell one partner to lean in and whisper something into the other person’s ear. It’s great for capturing a candid moment, because generally one of them will say something silly, or sweet, and the other person will break out into a huge smile or laugh. If you’re not great with posed photos, I recommend a pose like this, which can help bring out your personality and feel really natural.

Arm Around The Shoulder

Have one or both partners wrap their arm around the shoulder or waist of the other person. A few variations are to have them both look at each other, at the camera, and one person looking down candidly. You can also alternate between serious expressions and smiles.

Touching Foreheads

I love this pose so much! Why? Because look at how cute it is! It’s pretty simple too: hold hands and touch foreheads. For a more intimate moment, you can have them get close and close their eyes, too. For a more playful and fun shot, tell them to smile and laugh. Leaning in for a kiss is also an easy pose to go to from this one!

Walking

This can be another great natural moment between the two. You can walk toward the camera, hold hands while walking away from the camera, and even start walking away and then turn around and look back at the camera. I usually tell my couples to walk in “slow motion” so they’re relaxed and not rushed. In terms of eye contact, they can look forward, at each other, down and around. I usually tell them not to look directly at the camera, so the shot comes out looking a little more like a candid moment.

The Finale: Kiss and Foot Pop!

This is a great shot to do toward the end of the shoot. Have the couple get really close to each other, put their hands on each other’s waist or around their neck, and smooch! Jersey did the foot pop with her right foot, which I love. An advanced level variation of this is to do the dip: dip your partner halfway and then have a dramatic kiss. This might not be the pose for everyone, but if you like a grand gesture (and I do) then this can be the perfect pose!

I’ll be honest, I wrote this in part because my partner hates posing and I wanted to have a quick page of ideas that I could glance at when we’re out and I want to get a cute shot. So, I made a one-page PDF with pictures of all the poses and I’m giving it to you, too! Click here to download the freebie couple posing guide!

And if you liked this, have a look at my website, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest! I hope this gave you some ideas to try out on your next photoshoot, and good luck to everyone with your posing! Tag me @gdeimz on social if you post any of the ideas you try out!

Natalie & Andrew’s Modern Brooklyn Wedding

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I was asked to shoot a wedding at The Green Building in Brooklyn, NY this fall and it was the most charming thing I’ve ever seen. There were fairy lights strung around the entire place and an outdoor patio with a bar for the cocktail hour. The ceremony space had exposed brick and the couple, Natalie and Andrew, were absolutely lovely. They enjoyed their special day to the fullest, and they made photographing the wedding an absolute blast!

Check out the photos below for a full recap of their wedding (including a delicious cake from Milk Bar and some awesome reception dance shots!) and if you know someone who is getting married soon, hit me up and let’s talk about how we can capture your incredible day together! 🙂

If you liked these photos, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Seattle Summer Farm Wedding

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Bonney and David are a fun couple from Tacoma. I was excited to use their wedding as an excuse to take a vacation to Seattle! I had fun exploring Mount Rainier and downtown, and I shot their wedding in Tacoma. Fun fact, it’s where 10 Things I Hate About You was filmed!

The morning started off really relaxed as she got ready in one of the rooms of the church, which was historic and absolutely stunning. I love this candid I captured of her putting on her jewelry before the dress, which was her mother’s wedding dress.

Once she had her dress on, it was time to do the first look! They decided to do it in between the columns of the church, which created such a timeless look. I love the layers of her dress and how cute they look together.

This was one of my favorite parts. The planner helped them go up the steps of the church to the balcony so I could snap a few shots. It reminds me of Romeo and Juliet, so elegant and timeless.

This is when the day started speeding up. We had to shoot the wedding party photos, the details, and then the ceremony! I loved the pop of color in her flowers and how adorable the flower girls looked.

The ceremony went seamlessly and then it was time to head to their friend’s farm for the stunning reception. They made their getaway in a vintage red car, which was super cute and added to the elegant theme of the wedding.

Growing up as a farm girl, I love when I get to shoot farm or outdoor weddings. This one was no exception, and I loved the rustic feel with flowers picked from the garden and wooden logs placed as decor.

My favorite part of the night is by far when we got to go into a field around sunset and do this balloon portrait shoot! Their fun loving personality really shone through during this part, and we had a blast taking photos with their dogs.

Her dogs! Too cute, right?

I pulled Bonney aside to snap a few solo shots of her, because her dress was too stunning not to. I especially loved the added touch of flowers in her hair. The lighting was absolutely perfect.

Fairy lights strung around added to the mood of the reception as the sun set. We did one last shoot of the two of them before I left them to enjoy dancing and drinks. They started a bonfire for everyone to circle around, and it made for the best silhouette shots. Overall it was a wonderful wedding in Seattle and I had a blast shooting it. I can’t wait until I get to go back and shoot another!

If you like these photos, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Plaza Hotel NYC Engagement Photoshoot

Inspiration

Jersey and Luis are the most adorable couple. They’re born and raised New Yorkers who run a wellness Instagram together where they coach others and help people on their fitness journey. They’re also foodies who love cooking elaborate dishes together in their Upper East Side Apartment.

I asked them if they’d want to do a quick couple shoot near The Plaza Hotel and Central Park, and it just so happened that the day we shot together was their four year wedding anniversary! It was meant to be. From the second we met, they were all laughs, high energy, and so sweet. You could tell from their infectious smiles that they’re best friends and have so much fun together.

I tried a variety of poses and angles with them on this shoot. Walking together, sitting, crossing the street, facing each other and holding hands are all great options for couple photos. In some shots, like with the walking and crossing the street, I like to add a bit of movement, so I had Jersey move her skirt so it flowed a little bit.

The Pulitzer Fountain and trees made a great backdrop and bokeh, and for some of the shots I also tried a technique where I laid on the ground and angled up so The Plaza was directly behind them. As always, we had the best time shooting and I can’t wait to collaborate more with them. We’re planning a fitness shoot for them soon, so keep an eye out for that.

What are your favorite poses for engagement shoots? Also, are there any places in NYC that I just have to shoot at?! Drop a comment below with your thoughts and tell me what you think! And check out my favorites from our shoot at The Plaza below:

If you like these photos, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Brooklyn Bridge Engagement Sunset Shoot

photography tips

Just as I had written a post last week about my Brooklyn Bridge shoot, a couple contacted me wanting to do an engagement shoot of sorts on the bridge at sunset! They had lived in NYC for a few years but moved to Boston for medical school, and wanted to come back to do a shoot before they got married. I was super hyped to help them capture this moment, so I said of course!

I was excited to shoot again on the bridge, but this time I shot on the BK side, so the shots had a little bit different feel with the Manhattan skyline in the background. I’ve decided that either side works perfectly, and it just depends what time of day you’re shooting to which side you might want to shoot from.

Evening was the only time that worked for them, and I knew that would be a little tricky with all the people, but we managed to still get some adorable shots even with all the tourists walking the bridge! If you have the time (and don’t mind getting up at dawn) then I’d definitely say go for sunrise or early morning shots. The benefit to this is that hardly anyone will be on the bridge, so the background will look a little cleaner.

We ended up having a few breaks of people and I had enough time to snap some shots without anyone in the background, which was lucky because there were hundreds of people crossing the bridge! But sometimes you have to be crafty with your angles and just make it work.

The other tip I’d say is that Ela was wearing heels and I had forgotten that it’s a pretty long trek to get to the archway of the bridge (at least a 10-15 minute walk on the BK side) so definitely bring a change of shoes if you’re planning on wearing heels or something that’s not too comfortable for a mini hike. Besides that, the weather was perfect and we had a great time shooting!

You can check out my favorite photos from the shoot below:

If you like these, make sure to have a look at my website and follow me on Instagram! Feel free to drop me an email at gdeimz@gmail.com for any shoot requests, questions, or just to chat! If you’re in the NYC area, let’s grab coffee and talk lenses and shoot locations 🙂

Brooklyn Bridge Sunrise Wedding Shoot

wedding photography

I met my good friend Stanley when I first moved to NYC. He’s the sweetest guy in the entire world, and his wife is even more adorable! Stanley and I are both photographers, and through some of the wedding shoots we did together, he told me that he didn’t hire a professional photographer for his wedding!

As a photographer, I was like, “Dude, you’re crazy!” A photographer not getting high quality pictures at his own wedding?! I knew we had to remedy this. So when we got the opportunity to shoot some new Hayley Paige dresses in NYC, I thought, THIS IS IT!

Dress by Hayley Paige

I pretty much insisted (and wouldn’t take no for an option) that he and his lovely wife model the looks, and get some much needed gorgeous wedding photos. We decided to shoot on the Brooklyn Bridge at sunrise. It was a substantial undertaking, because we knew that to be *at* the BKB by 5am, we’d have to get ready, do makeup, etc. wayyy before that.

We ended up meeting around 3am to start the project (Stanley was late per usual). There were some very sleepy eyes and tired brains involved. But everything was worth it once we got to the bridge. There was nobody on the bridge, besides a few cyclists here and there. It was the perfect setting, and the sun was just about to rise.

Sunrise on the Brooklyn Bridge

And they turned out to be the MOST gorgeous photos I’ve ever taken there. Stanley and his wife looked absolutely stunning, and the backdrop of the city was even better than I could have hoped for. They were so natural together, and the intricate detail of the dress matched perfectly.

The second we started shooting, we knew that waking up in the middle of the night had totally been worth it for the shots. We shot everything in about 45 minutes, and just like that, the sun had risen and people started to wake up. Tourists began walking on the bridge, and we headed home for a nice nap.

To this day, they are still some of my all-time wedding photos I’ve taken EVER. Because, look at how adorable they are! When I do styled shoots, I almost always like to use real couples as the models, because you can tell how authentic their love is in the shot.

Tips For Shooting On The Brooklyn Bridge: Go for sunrise. Hardly anyone will be there, which will mean you can grab the perfect shot, and get the gorgeous golden hour tones. Walk over from the Manhattan side, I’ve found that the lighting is better this way.

Check out the rest of my favorites from the shoot:

3 Suggestions From Your Wedding Photographer

photography tips

Planning a wedding can be overwhelming and exhausting. I’ve shot a wedding or two–or fifty– and I wanted to share a few tips from a photographers perspective to help create some ease on the wedding day. Here are some things I have noticed that can really make the day go a lot smoother:

1. Scheduling. As wedding photographers, we know that your special day is going to be really busy, and trying to fit everything in can get kinda crazy. What most people don’t realize is that the wedding photographer is going to be with you all day long, so scheduling is very important. Most weddings fall into this general schedule: getting ready, portraits, wedding, reception. But things can be tailored and adjusted depending on the details of your wedding. For example, do you want to do a first look? If so, the wedding party photos can all be done before the actual ceremony. That will save time later so you can relax and freshen up before the reception. Talking with your photographer in detail about the schedule can clear up any confusion and help decide the right schedule for your wedding. 

2. Hotel Decor. Drab rooms with dark curtains letting in no natural light will be the death of your getting ready pictures. Make sure that the room you choose to get ready with your bridesmaids has windows for a lot of natural light. Also make sure that it’s big enough. There’s nothing worse for a wedding photog than falling over everyone getting ready in a tiny room while trying to stay out of the way, and get the pictures you need. Photos of the bride getting her hair done, spending the morning with her bridesmaids, and putting on her gown will set the tone for the entire day, so make sure there’s enough space and light! 

3. Guests. Your family and friends are excited, and want to capture this special moment for you. But a huge problem nowadays is having every guest standing during the wedding holding out their iPhones to take photos. Nothing ruins a gorgeous first kiss photo more than all the aunts and uncles trying to take photos and videos from their phones. I promise the quality of those will be terrible, and you hired a photographer to get that perfect shot for you! Let us do our job of capturing your day and kindly ask your guests to limit the technology if possible.

These are just a few common issues I see often while shooting weddings. The key is to keep your photographer informed and communicate so you can work together to capture such an important day in your life!

Why It’s Important to Invite Your Wedding Photographer to the Meal

photography tips

Brides magazine recently published a truly terribly misinformed article advising brides not to feed their wedding photographers, stating that photographers should pack a lunch themselves or make sure it’s in the contract. As a professional wedding photographer, I can tell you from personal experience that not feeding your photographer is a huge mistake. Wedding photographers are there from the very beginning of the day, usually starting with the bride’s hair and makeup early in the morning. A typical day is anywhere from 6-12 hours, and we are on our feet shooting and working our hardest the entire day to make sure we get everything. We don’t get breaks. Most of the time, we don’t even get lunch. So, brides, not only should you feed your wedding photographer, but you should save a spot for them at your reception to eat dinner.

A lot of brides choose to give a vendor meal to the wedding photographer along with the DJ and other people who are working on the wedding day because it is less expensive than the meal that the guests will be eating. That vendor meal typically consists of a cold sandwich and a side, like chips. I am here to tell you that a vendor meal and ushering the photographer out to sit in a small room outside of the reception area to eat will not lead to a happy photographer. And brides, the last thing you want on your wedding day is a disgruntled photographer.

Your wedding photographer is the person who will be with you the entire day. We are working hard and taking literally thousands of photos to document this special day of your life. We are the only ones who are there the entire time, following you from getting ready to the first look through the “I do’s” and late into the night, usually until you leave. It’s more than just a business agreement. We are experiencing some of the most previous and intimate moments of your life, and we are capturing it. Giving us a hot meal and a place to sit for a few minutes at the reception is a small, well deserved token of appreciation that you can do for your photographer, and I promise that it will go a long way.

Too often, wedding photographers are treated like they are just another an employee. But we have a unique position on the day of the wedding. We are artists, creating images that will document this important day for you, and that you will treasure for years to come. We want you to have photographs that capture great memories from the day. You are letting us into your life, and in exchange, we are putting our heart and soul into these images.

The cost of a few more dollars and a seat at a table will have a huge impact: getting a short break from all day of standing, getting some hot food for nourishment and a cold glass of water for hydration will leave us energized and ready to photograph all of the dancing that is sure to follow dinner. Not to mention the appreciation we will have for the bride and groom. The extra effort you give will be reciprocated by the extra effort we will put into your photographs, guaranteed.

3 Skills You Need To Be A Wedding Photographer

photography tips

Being a wedding photographer is an intense and quite stressful job with long hours (and benefits of dinner and wedding cake at the end of the day). But besides all that, wedding photographers have to be very versatile when shooting. Wedding photographers are basically three types of photographers all combined into one.

1. Documentary Photojournalist: Those candids of the bride and her mom after she puts her dress on. The photo of that laugh that the bride and groom share at the reception. All the dance floor fun caught on camera. These are the product of a photojournalist, someone who captures all of the important moments, and the small details too. Try to always be on the lookout for special moments to photograph. The key to this type of photography is to place yourself in the background, so no one feels like they are being photographed, and so natural moments can happen. Best lens for the job: 70-200mm f/2.8

2. Portrait Photographer: The well-lit, natural-light headshot of the bride after she gets ready. All of the perfectly-posed portraiture of the wedding party at the church. The gorgeous sunset length photo of the bride and groom that looks like it could be on the cover of Vogue. These are the photos from the portrait photographer, someone who knows how to pose people and use lighting and angles to their advantage. To shoot successful wedding portraits and group photos, know your light source(s) and become an expert at posing groups of two to twenty. Best lens for the job: 50mm f/1.4

3. Fine Art Photographer: The macro shots of the wedding rings. The perfectly composed still life images of the groom’s shoes, with his tie delicately draped over the side. The long exposure shot of the bride and groom’s nighttime exit with sparklers. All of these are the product of a fine art photographer, who lets their creative side out and turns the most simple shot into a work of art. For the best creative and fine art wedding photos, try stepping outside your comfort zone with new angles, dramatic lighting, or an interesting background. Best lens for the job: Macro 105mm f/2.8 

So, the next time you see a wedding photographer frantically running around at the reception or artfully posing a group of eighty people after the ceremony, thank them for their hard work. Or just hand them some cake.