Pink Photoshoot Locations in NYC

Inspiration, photography tips

If you’re like me, you might be kinda obsessed with the color pink. One of my favorite pastimes is wandering around New York and finding perfect pink spots to set up photoshoots. So, I thought it would be awesome to compile all the information into one article. After two years of exploring, here are my personal recommendations for the best pink photoshoot locations in NYC.

Museum of Ice Cream

The Museum of Ice Cream is a fabulous playground in NYC for all things ice cream related. As an added bonus, the entire building is painted head to toe with pink pastels. We spent almost three hours exploring and taking tons of pictures, and it’s a super fun activity for an afternoon. We went on a weekday, which was way less busy than the weekends.

Cha Cha Matcha

This pink matcha heaven also doubles as a great spot to grab a drink or even some soft serve! They have multiple locations, but the biggest one with the pink doorway is the 1558 Broadway location. This just proves that we love pink so matcha!

M Tea

M Tea just opened up in Flushing, Queens, and it is a lovely space that does not disappoint. It will take you some time to trek to Flushing from the city, but I promise it will be worth it for the amazing photos! It’s a two story building that includes clusters of pink chair pods, a massive pink hot air balloon that ascends to the ceiling, and a pink phone booth upstairs. I had the pink smoothie (big surprise) and it was as delicious as it was pink!

Pietro Nolita

Pietro Nolita is a very pink restaurant that prides itself on being “Pink as F*ck.” I went there for my birthday this year and took some fun pink inspired photos, as well as tried some of their amazing pasta. There’s lots of options, because the inside is just as pink as the outside benches. Also, I HIGHLY recommend checking out the bathroom, as it’s completely pink as well!

Pixinity

The Pixinity Pop-Up was an immersive experience complete with pixelated icons, a New York themed room, a giant avocado, and a massive pink ball pit. The pop up ended in November, but creator Tianyu Qiu told me that he has some more pop up ideas up his sleeve, so keep an eye out for his next project!

Central Park

Central Park in the spring is the perfect place to get your pink on! When the Crabapple trees start blooming, pink petals create a stunning pastel spectacle in the park. Check out Conservatory Garden’s Center Garden from mid-April to mid-May, that’s when they’re typically in bloom.

Tiny’s and the Bar Upstairs

This adorable pink building is the perfect backdrop for a photoshoot in NYC. You do have to be careful though, because that street can get busy with traffic, but we went on a Sunday morning and it was completely empty. I’ve also eaten at Tiny’s and the food is phenomenal!

Your Apartment

Look, when all else fails, buy some confetti and have your own shoot in your room! We bought a pack of pink confetti from Amazon for less than $10 and had a mini photoshoot against a white wall in our apartment. Pro tip: use a wall that’s facing a window, so you get the best lighting. Second pro tip: use the slow-mo option on your iPhone and take an awesome video throwing the confetti!

I hope these locations got you excited to take some pink photos around the city! If you liked this article, have a look at my website, InstagramYouTube and Pinterest! I hope this gave you some new ideas to try out on your next photoshoot. Tag me @gdeimz on social if you go to any of the pink spots for a photoshoot in NYC!

Should You Credit Your Photographer?

Uncategorized

Matt Healy of the popular British rock band The 1975 has sparked a huge debate online this week with an Instagram post and a question. He posted a photo of himself at a concert, taken by music photographer Robert Gallardo, and asked his followers how they felt about crediting your photographer. Healy stated that since he personally knew the photographer, he felt the need to credit him for his image, but that in general he thought it was not necessary for the artist to credit the photographer if it was an image of himself. You can read the full text of his comment below.

No alt text provided for this image

There were thousands of comments from artists, musicians, and fans chiming in on their opinions. An overwhelming number of people responded in favor of crediting the photographer, due to the fact that it’s an original artwork that they have created and therefore should be credited as such. Photographer Ashly Nicole compared the scenario to other mediums and forms to make her point, saying, “You had people share your art and say it was created by you, and it should be the same for a photographer or even an illustrator. Just because it’s not the same medium as your art, doesn’t make it not art nor extinguish the hard work put into the art. Give credit no matter the medium,”

No alt text provided for this image

As a photographer myself watching this unfold, I was pretty shocked. I know how it feels to put in a lot of time and effort for a photoshoot only for it to be posted by a media outlet or someone online without proper credit. For someone with such a big platform and voice in the industry, it’s disheartening to see Healy take that stance. He might not realize it, but he has the power to impact the entire career of a photographer by posting one photo that they have taken.

In this social media age, your work being shown by accounts with millions of followers holds a lot of value. When someone like Matt Healy posts your photo, the digital currency of your work increases. By not tagging the photographer, you’re effectively robbing them of potential opportunities, future jobs, and exposure. To me, that’s stealing.

No matter the medium, when people put in hard work, they deserve to be credited. There’s a reason that there are credits at the end of a movie and the back of a magazine. It’s to acknowledge when someone has participated in a production. The same goes for photographers, and makeup artists, and designers, and painters. I’m a photographer, so I might be biased, but I think credit should always be given.

Healy updated his post later, stating that he “lost the debate” and tagging Robert Gallardo in the post. What are your thoughts? Comment below what you would have done, or how you think this impacts the industry standards of crediting photographers.

Moving To NYC

Inspiration

I always had a feeling that I didn’t quite fit in, in Callaway County, MO, Population 44,000, but it started to become extra obvious around my preteen years. While other girls were decorating their rooms with butterflies and stars, I filled canvases with skyscrapers and pictures of the Eiffel and the Arc de Triomph. I asked my parents for supplies to learn knitting and screen printing and video editing and painting, and once they put the camera in my hand, it never left. 

My mom had given it to me to take pictures at a concert, but while I was waiting in line, I saw a lady wearing a gorgeous cream-colored sun hat with colorful beads on the rim, just barely covering her eyes, and I took a picture of her face. When I showed my mom, she scolded me, saying, “Gaby, stop taking pictures of strangers!” She didn’t understand yet, but I did. Even then, I knew I wanted to capture people, to make them timeless, to show the beauty in life, to show the essence of being human. It wasn’t until almost a decade later, in college, when I was told the word for what I was creating: portraits. 

Some kids ask for a car on their 16th birthday. I asked to take a trip to New York City. I stepped onto the concrete playground and fell in love. I walked around Manhattan with wonder and Central Park in awe. It was even better than I’d hoped. I knew I wanted to live there. And now, somehow, my dream is finally coming true. Today is the day. My plane leaves Lambert in an hour. But it’s still pretty scary. I just want to find a place to call home in the creative world where I know I belong, because, for my artistic side, that place was never Missouri.

I cant wait for the adventures, the art, the creating and hating and loving and funny moments and small still silences and the crazy bustling streets and coffeeshops and the overwhelming sense of movement and life and progression and finding yourself and getting lost on the way and everything in between. A city I love, a craft I love, and time. Fingers crossed. 

As I paid for my one-way ticket to LaGuardia airport, I had to chuckle, because it asked, “Business or Personal?” It’s both.

Finding Inspiration In New Places

Inspiration

I’ve been in London almost a month, and I’ve barely unpacked my camera. I’ve settled into my flat, successfully navigated the Underground to make it to my fashion photography courses, and even managed to make some friends and go out with them. But I haven’t been taking any photos.

At first, I was getting a bit exasperated with myself. I’m a photographer in London and I can’t find anything to photograph? What’s wrong with me? But sometimes when you are in a brand new place, it can be overwhelming. I haven’t had any big ideas for conceptual shoots yet, and at first, that freaked me out. I wondered, where had the inspiration gone?

It’s not that I wasn’t interested or inspired; actually, it was quite the opposite. I’ve been going to art galleries–Tate Modern, The Royal Academy, Bjork Digital at Sommerset House. I was being inspired, I was just overwhelmed. Sometimes your headspace can get so full of absorbing what’s around you or being busy with routine tasks that it can feel like there isn’t any room for creativity or inspiration.

I often find that when I’m in need of an inspiration increase, it’s because I haven’t been giving enough attention to working on creative projects. While some things just have to be done during the day–work, cooking dinner, answering emails, binge watching Stranger Things— I think it’s important to carve out some time to focus on your creativity. It doesn’t even have to be a lot of time. Take ten minutes before bed and sketch or write. Allow yourself one hour in a coffeeshop to sip tea and brainstorm. Use a lunch break to collaborate with coworkers. Share and discuss ideas. Take a walk with no distractions. Leave your phone at home and look at the amazing world around you.

Dream, ponder, create. Let yourself think of ideas, even if they are terrible. Especially if they are terrible. Start somewhere, because you can build off that to find better and more cohesive ideas. See a play, or take a yoga class to clear your head. It’s all about your mindset. You are uniquely you, and you have the imagination to do it. You just need to refocus and revitalize your creative energy and vision.

Other ways I combat the creativity gap: organize. Keep a list of ideas, mood boards, photo samples, drawings and snippets of inspiration from anywhere. I take pictures of spaces in restaurants, billboards, even just people walking down the street. Cut out visually interesting pieces from magazines or newspapers. Designspiration is a great website that I use to get the wheels turning in my head.

Most importantly, give yourself a break, and realize that mental inspiration blocks are pretty common with creatives. Inspiration can be found all around us; it just takes time to process and interpret. Just be patient, keep going, and be open to letting yourself absorb the world around you. If you are mindful in those ways, I promise that inspiration will follow.

3 Skills You Need To Be A Wedding Photographer

photography tips

Being a wedding photographer is an intense and quite stressful job with long hours (and benefits of dinner and wedding cake at the end of the day). But besides all that, wedding photographers have to be very versatile when shooting. Wedding photographers are basically three types of photographers all combined into one.

1. Documentary Photojournalist: Those candids of the bride and her mom after she puts her dress on. The photo of that laugh that the bride and groom share at the reception. All the dance floor fun caught on camera. These are the product of a photojournalist, someone who captures all of the important moments, and the small details too. Try to always be on the lookout for special moments to photograph. The key to this type of photography is to place yourself in the background, so no one feels like they are being photographed, and so natural moments can happen. Best lens for the job: 70-200mm f/2.8

2. Portrait Photographer: The well-lit, natural-light headshot of the bride after she gets ready. All of the perfectly-posed portraiture of the wedding party at the church. The gorgeous sunset length photo of the bride and groom that looks like it could be on the cover of Vogue. These are the photos from the portrait photographer, someone who knows how to pose people and use lighting and angles to their advantage. To shoot successful wedding portraits and group photos, know your light source(s) and become an expert at posing groups of two to twenty. Best lens for the job: 50mm f/1.4

3. Fine Art Photographer: The macro shots of the wedding rings. The perfectly composed still life images of the groom’s shoes, with his tie delicately draped over the side. The long exposure shot of the bride and groom’s nighttime exit with sparklers. All of these are the product of a fine art photographer, who lets their creative side out and turns the most simple shot into a work of art. For the best creative and fine art wedding photos, try stepping outside your comfort zone with new angles, dramatic lighting, or an interesting background. Best lens for the job: Macro 105mm f/2.8 

So, the next time you see a wedding photographer frantically running around at the reception or artfully posing a group of eighty people after the ceremony, thank them for their hard work. Or just hand them some cake.